Justices of the Peace

The position of justice of the peace is the oldest one in the state of Vermont. It was created by the Vermont Constitution in 1777.

In Vermont, justices of the peace (JP) are actually county officers, even though they are elected at the annual Town Meeting in March.  They must be legal voters of their town to qualify.

To become a justice of the peace, you must be elected in a general election or be appointed to fill a vacancy. Nominations can be made by:

  • members of the local party caucus
  • town committee
  • filing as an independent candidate
  • write-in candidate on the general election ballot (town)

Each term of office starts Feb. 1 following the general election. All justices of the peace must take the oath of office and oath of allegiance before he/she can be fully qualified. A notarized copy of those oaths must be filed with the Town Clerk’s office.

Justice of the Peace Guide (2010)

Town of Roxbury Justices of the Peace (as of 08-15-2019)
Gerald D’Amico
Adam Jackson
Susan Nevins
Charles Slocum
Vacant
After serving many years as one of Roxbury’s Justices of the Peace, Gloria Gerdes resigned her position.  Roxbury has been lucky to have this dedicated citizen working hard at the polling place, attending Board of Abatement Meetings and Board of Civil Authority Meetings and participating in Tax Appeals.  We wish Gloria much happiness in her time of leisure.
Responsibilities of Roxbury’s Justices of the Peace
Elections
Justices of the Peace are members of the Board of Civil Authority (BCA). They serve as election officials at town, statewide, and federal elections. Justices also are responsible for delivering absentee ballots to voters during election time.
Tax Abatement
Justices of the Peace sit as members of the Town Board of Abatement to determine whether a taxpayer’s tax burden should be forgiven under certain circumstances.
Appeals
As a member of the Board of Civil Authority, Justices hear and adjudicate appeals by citizens who disagree with the final decision of the Listers.
Marriages and Civil Unions
Justices of the Peace can perform marriages and certify civil unions in Vermont.
Notary Public / Oaths
Justices of the Peace have the same acknowledgement powers as a Notary Public. They may also administer oaths in all cases where an oath is required, unless the law states otherwise.
Magistrate
Justices of the Peace may also serve as a magistrate if commissioned by the Vermont Supreme Court.